Book Your Winter Holiday Party in Gastown Vancouver, BC

Come celebrate any of your favorite winter holiday with us at the Mexican Food Restaurant La Casita Gastown in Vancouver, BC. We will have tons of super delicious menu and drink specials for you to enjoy. Bring your friends, family or co-workers and have fun!

To book a table call us now at 604 646 2444 or make a reservation online at:
http://www.lacasita.ca/make-a-reservation/


Source: nilshognestad
‘I don’t always drink #giantmargaritas, but when I do, I wear a #dicktiara’ #dirtythirty


Source: mariacocolisa
Big lunch with huge drinks
#cincodemayo #margaritas #picodegallo #guacamole #burritobowl #quesadillas #tapatio #valentina #cholula #instagood #instafood #foodporn


Source: amylouise_baker
Large beverage for three
#lacasita #margarita #mexicanrestaurant


Source: katherine_mckinnon
I think I found a little gem last night!
#lacasita #tacotuesday #gastown #vancouver

Bodhi Day: 8 December – Day of Enlightenment, celebrating the day that the historical Buddha (Shakyamuni or Siddhartha Gautama) experienced enlightenment (also known as Bodhi). New Years

Advent: four Sundays preceding Christmas Day

Krampusnacht: 5 December – The Feast of St. Nicholas is celebrated in parts of Europe on 6 December. In Alpine countries, Saint Nicholas has a devilish companion named Krampus who punishes the bad children the night before.

Saint Nicholas’ Day: 6 December

Feast of the Immaculate Conception Day: 8 December – The day of Virgin Mary’s Immaculate Conception is celebrated as a public holiday in many Catholic countries.

Saint Lucia’s Day: 13 December – Church Feast Day. Saint Lucia comes as a young woman with lights and sweets.

Las Posadas: 16–24 December – procession to various family lodgings for celebration & prayer and to re-enact Mary & Joseph’s journey to Bethlehem

Longest Night: A modern Christian service to help those coping with loss, usually held on the eve of the Winter solstice.

Christmas Eve: 24 December – In many countries e.g. the German speaking countries, but also in Poland, Hungary and the Nordic countries, gift giving is on 24 December.

Christmas Day: 25 December and 7 January – celebrated by Christians and non-Christians alike.

Anastasia of Sirmium feast day: 25 December

Twelve Days of Christmas: 25 December–6 January

Saint Stephen’s Day: 26 December – In Germany, Poland and the Czech Republic a holiday celebrated as Second Day of Christmas.

Saint John the Evangelist’s Day: 27 December

Holy Innocents’ Day: 28 December

Saint Sylvester’s Day: 31 December

Pancha Ganapati: a modern five-day Hindu festival celebrated from December 21 through 25 in honor of Ganesha.

Malkh: 25 December

Mōdraniht: or Mothers’ Night, the Saxon winter solstice festival.

Saturnalia: 17–23 December – An ancient Roman winter solstice festival in honor of the deity Saturn, held on the 17 December of the Julian calendar and expanded with festivities through to 23 December. Celebrated with sacrifice, a public banquet, followed by private gift-giving, continual partying, and a carnival.

Dies Natalis Solis Invicti (Day of the birth of the Unconquered Sun): 25 December – late Roman Empire

HumanLight: 23 December – Humanist holiday originated by the New Jersey Humanist Network in celebration of “a Humanist’s vision of a good future.”[10]

Hanukkah: usually falls anywhere between late November and early January. See “movable”

Yule: Pagan winter festival that was celebrated by the historical Germanic people from late December to early January.

Yalda: 21 December – The turning point, Winter Solstice. As the longest night of the year and the beginning of the lengthening of days, Shabe Yaldā or Shabe Chelle is an Iranian festival celebrating the victory of light and goodness over darkness and evil. Shabe yalda means ‘birthday eve.’ According to Persian mythology, Mithra was born at dawn on 22 December to a virgin mother. He symbolizes light, truth, goodness, strength, and friendship. Herodotus reports that this was the most important holiday of the year for contemporary Persians. In modern times Persians celebrate Yalda by staying up late or all night, a practice known as Shab Chera meaning ‘night gazing’. Fruits and nuts are eaten, especially pomegranates and watermelons, whose red color invokes the crimson hues of dawn and symbolize

Koliada: Slavic winter festival celebrated on late December with parades and singers who visit houses and receive gifts.

Boxing Day: 26 December.

Human Rights Day: 10 December

Dongzhi Festival – a celebration of Winter

Hogmanay: night of 31 December–before dawn of 1 January – Scottish New Year’s Eve celebration
Newtonmas: 25 December – As an alternative to celebrating the religious holiday Christmas, some atheists and skeptics have chosen to celebrate December 25 as Newtonmas, due to it being Isaac Newton’s birthday on the old style date.

Kwanzaa: 26 December–1 January – Pan-African festival celebrated in the US

New Year’s Eve: 31 December – last day of the Gregorian year

Soyal: 21 December – Zuni and Hopi

Solstice: On or about 21 December.

Zamenhof Day: 15 December – Birthday of Ludwig Zamenhof, inventor of Esperanto; holiday reunion for

Watch Night: 31 December

Chalica: first week of December – A holiday created in 2005, celebrated by some Unitarian Universalists.

Erastide: In David Eddings’ Belgariad and Malloreon series, Erastide is a celebration of the day on which the Seven Gods created the world. Greetings (“Joyous Erastide”) and gifts are exchanged, and feasts are held.

Feast of Winter Veil: 15 December–2 January – A holiday in World of Warcraft. This holiday is based on Christmas. Cities are decorated with lights and a tree with presents. Special quests, items and snowballs are available to players during this time. The character of “Greatfather Winter”, who is modeled after Santa Claus, appears. Festival of the Winter Veil was and still is a legitimate holiday of European religions like Wicca. The Germanic tribes used to celebrate the Winter Solstice as a time to be thankful for the blessings given to them to survive harsh winters. The term “Weil”, incorrectly translated to “veil”, means abundance in German.

Feast of Alvis: in the TV series Sealab 2021. “Believer, you have forgotten the true meaning of Alvis Day. Neither is it ham, nor pomp. Nay, the true meaning of Alvis day is drinking. Drinking and revenge.”–Alvis

Hogswatch: a holiday celebrated on the fictional world of Discworld. It is very similar to the Christian celebration of Christmas.

Festivus: 23 December – a parody holiday created by Daniel O’Keefe and made popular by Seinfeld as an alternative to Christmas.

Frostvale: the winter holidays in the Artix Entertainment universe

Decemberween: 25 December – a parody of Christmas that features gift-giving, carol-singing and decorated trees. The fact that it takes place on December 25, the same day as Christmas, has been presented as just a coincidence, and it has been stated that Decemberween traditionally takes place “55 days after Halloween”. The holiday has been featured in the Homestar Runner series.
Wintersday, the end-of-the-year celebration in the fictional universe of the Guild Wars franchise, starts every year mid December and ends the next year on early January.

IES Competition Time, Don’s Event questions on the number of trips he took all over the world and in return offering prizes for the person who can guess closest. Follows this up with everyone’s favourite Andrew Award presentation.

Winter’s Crest, the winter celebration held on the continent of Tal’Dorei in the world of Exandria, as featured in the RPG show Critical Role.

Sadeh: A mid-winter feast to honor fire and to “defeat the forces of darkness, frost and cold”. Sadé or Sada is an ancient Iranian tradition celebrated 50 days before Nowruz. Sadeh in Persian means “hundred” and refers to one hundred days and nights left to the beginning of the new year celebrated at the first day of spring on March 21 each year. Sadeh is a midwinter festival that was celebrated with grandeur and magnificence in ancient Iran. It was a festivity to honor fire and to defeat the forces of darkness, frost, and cold.

Chahar Shanbeh Suri: Festival of Fire, Last Wednesday of the Iranian Calendar year. It marks the importance of the light over the darkness, and arrival of spring and revival of nature.

Chahārshanbe–Sūri (Persian: چهارشنبه‌سوری), pronounced Chārshanbe–Sūri (Persian: چارشنبه‌سوری) is the ancient Iranian festival dating at least back to 1700 BCE of the early Zoroastrian era.[1] The festival of fire is a prelude to the ancient Norouz festival, which marks the arrival of spring and revival of nature. Chahrshanbeh Soori, is celebrated the last Tuesday night of the year.

Ramadan: During this holy time, the ninth month of the Islamic calendar year, Muslims do not eat, drink, or smoke from sunrise to sunset for an entire month. Instead, they spend their days in worship, praying in mosques. At the end of Ramadan, people celebrate with a festival known as Id-ul-Fitr.

Eid -Ul-Fitr Eid-Ul-Adha Hijri new Year Asyura Maulid Isra mi’raj Middle sya’ban (lay’at Al-Nisfu) Day of Arafa

Hanukkah – Ḥănukkāh, usually spelled חנוכה, pronounced [χanuˈka] in Modern Hebrew; a transliteration also romanized as Chanukah or Chanukkah), also known as the Festival of Lights, Feast of Dedication, is an eight-day Jewish holiday commemorating the re-dedication of the Holy Temple (the Second Temple) in Jerusalem at the time of the Maccabean Revolt against the Seleucid Empire of the 2nd century BC. Hanukkah is observed for eight nights and days, starting on the 25th day of Kislev according to the Hebrew calendar, which may occur at any time from late November to late December in the Gregorian calendar.

Diwali: mid-October–mid-November – known as the Festival of Lights, this Hindu holiday celebrates the victory of good over evil. The five-day festival is marked by ceremonies, fireworks and sweets.

Navratri: The great nine nights of the Goddess Durga, commemorating Her victory against the demon Mahishasura.

Kartik Purnima

Onam

Janamashtami

Rama Navami

Maha Shivaratri

Sharad Purnima / Lakshmi Puja / Kali Puja

Vasant Panchami

First round of fresh tortilla chips with two deadly salsas is on us.

We will refill your glass with any of these soft drinks as many times as you want for free:

– regular cola
– diet cola
– lemon pop
– ginger ale
– lemonade
– club soda
– raspberry iced tea
– cranberry beverage
– clamato beverage

Check out our weekly specials:

Daily
$9 and $13 Lunch Specials

Happy Hour 3PM – 5PM from Monday to Friday
$4 Red and White Wine
$4 Highball with the choice of Bombay Sapphire, Three Olives, Crown Royal or Bacardi
$4 All Mexican or Granville Island Beer
$4 100% Agave Jose Cuervo Tradicional Tequila Shots

Sundays
$8 Three Olives Double Caesar

Mondays
$6 Burritos
$4 Jose Cuervo Margarita

Tuesdays
$3 Tacos: Fish, Carnita, Chorizo, Chicken & Awesome Veggie Mix
$4 Granville Island, English Bay Pale Ale and Island Lager Draft Beer

Wednesdays
$5 SOL beer

Thursdays
$4 Jose Cuervo Chilled Shot

Fridays
$6 Dos Equis Beer

Saturdays
$6 Tecate Tallcan Beer

FREE space for parties and events

FREE meal for the birthday person with a table of 7 or more

GIFT CARDS of any value

Proudly serving our customers since 1995!

La Casita Gastown
Mexican Food Restaurant
Delivery, lunch, dinner and events!
101 West Cordova str, V6B 1E1
Vancouver, BC, CANADA
Phone: 604 646 2444
http://www.lacasita.ca/